Immigration

Immigration law refers to national government policies controlling the immigration and deportation of people, and other matters such as citizenship. Immigration laws vary from country to country, as well as according to the political climate of the times, as sentiments may sway from the widely inclusive to the deeply exclusive of new immigrants.

Immigration law regarding the citizens of a country is regulated by international law. The United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights mandates that all countries allow entry to its own citizens.

Certain countries may maintain rather strict laws which regulate both the right of entry and internal rights, such as the duration of stay and the right to participate in government. Most countries have laws which designate a process for naturalization, by which foreigners may become citizens.

Citizenship / Naturalization

If you meet certain requirements, you may become a U.S. citizen either at birth or after birth.

To become a citizen at birth, you must either have been born in the United States or certain territories or outlying possessions of the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; or had a parent or parents who were citizens at the time of your birth (if you were born abroad) and meet other requirements.

To become a citizen after birth, you must apply for “derived” or “acquired” citizenship through parents.

Most naturalization applicants are required to take a test on English and Civics (U.S. history and government). The USCIS provides resources to help you prepare for these tests.

Contact immigration attorney Yveline Paul at (786) 536-4567 or (863) 675-6752 for assistance with your immigration needs.

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